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present member dhaka by law. it's a great pleasure to be reviewed. i feel so happy. thank you for your hospitality. this is my first visit as the president-elect of mexico, and i also want to congratulate you for your victory last november 6th for your second term as president to the united states and we wish you great success. i know you have a great task before you but i trust that you will be doing a wonderful job and i also want to thank you, president obama for having the vice president joe biden were go to mexico for the inaugural ceremony next saturday december 1st. i feel so pleased to be able to have the vice president biden represent you in mexico, and of course we are waiting for you in the delegation. >> [speaking in native tongue] the >> this is an opportunity we only have every 12 years. you will be starting your next four year term. i will be starting a six year administration in mexico as you know and i think this is a great opportunity for all of us to have a closer link of brotherhood and sisterhood and collaboration and of course of great accomplishments we might hav
bazell, nbc news, new york. >>> up next here tonight, the actual research about getting along with the in-laws. >>> veteran new yorkers didn't know what they were looking at last night. a lot of them were worried someone had gone and tarted up the dignified empire state building. it was the first display of a new array of lights at the very top of what is still the grand master of the new york skyline. last night's show was coordinated to an alicia keys song. the owners of the building say they'll use the new led lights to display various light patterns from now on. we'll be watching. >>> one of the most influential figures in american sports has died. marvin miller never played major league baseball, but he changed the game nonetheless. when he took the job as leader of the major league players union in 66, the minimum salary back then was $6,000, and the owners had all the power. by 1982, when he retired, the union was one of the strongest in the u.s. the average player's salary was almost a quarter million dollars. the players had won free agency. he was by any standard a game changer. marv
in the the health care law might mauck you down right sick right now. the white house just announcing plans to slap health insurers with a fee if they sell insurance dictated by the president's health care law and larry says you'll pay for it no matter where you live, huh? >> that's right. that's right, you know, administrative costs and health care are already skyrocketing and this is going it to get past the consumer just like everybody else. we already see skyrocketing health care costs, 14% is administrated, it's just too much. >> some parts of the law lower prices and is it net neutral, basically? >> i think the only given is that the country as a whole is goingo spend mor on health care andore people are going to have insurance one way or another, gun point are fine or whatever it is, but the actual premiums among are necessarily going to change. although there are plenty of things to raise your premium, not allowing the insurance company to reject, is going to raise premiums and some premiums are paid for like a tax next year, on capital gains for wealthy people, it's not health care payment
, everyone. thank you both for coming on. remember, don't get along with your in-laws. that is the more own a gun. was it could? to like this? that is our show tonight. [applause] >> and n john stossel. john: food can kill. people will eat the wrong stuff may get sick. it's while most everyone says we need government to set some limits. make sure there is not bacteria in your food or dangerous chemicals. to make sure food companies tell you what is in their food and how fattening it i. state legiator felix ortiz has done that in new york city. he got trans fat man, calorie counts posted at mcdonald's and other fast-food places. now he wants a ban on adding too much salt. so you think he saved lives? >> absolutely. john: okay. a farmer. he grows vegetables dollar raises cows, chickens, and pigs. i assume you want the people who buy your beef and pork to be safe so don't we owe him a vote of thanks for saving this? >> no. i would say you're killing me out here. trying to get my stuff to market. this plethora of government regulaons, you know, is killing our farm and our ability to come to mar
and supervisor milk to me, as i was a law student in the bay area when the assassinations happened, and wanted to be part of a government that was going to be much more open. in fact, i had to sue the government in order to make it more open. and those years where struggle and just representing people who wanted to make the city much more equality bent was where i felt. and i feel today that if mayor moscone and harvey milk were here, they'd be pretty proud of what we've been able to accomplish in those years. seeing how mayor brown became mayor and my lucky charm of being now the first asian mayor of the city, understanding -- thank you. (applause) >> understanding now that we have the first african-american as president of the united states has now been reelected. [cheering and applauding] >> and this is in addition to all of the local regional lgbt persons that have been elected and a pointed to this wonderful city and the region. * appointed i think they would smile, that they would see that their efforts to make this city much more equitable for everybody has been already accomplished. a
is unconstitutional and today she told law enforcement to use their own discretion. >> this will make clear to them that they have the right to release those undocumented immigrants if they believe that 's in the best interest of public safety in their community. >> secure communities instructs law enforcement to hold undocuments immigrants until ice can pick them up. critics say it clogs jails and nets too many people who are not dangerous criminals. >>> federal regulators have given the green light to disney's $4 billion deal to purchase bay area-based lucas film. there's still no word on formal closing dates and neither company has responded to requests for comment. lucas film founder george lucas is to receive about half of the purchase price in cash and half in newly-issued disney shares. he said he plans to donate much of it to charity. >>> wall street is reacting positively to news of a net fliks deal with disney. netflix stock jumped some 14% on word that the los gatos-based company has secured the rights to stream new disney movies shortly after they're out of theaters. that won't happen,
that in stockton and san bernardino. we go to court and bankruptcy law versus pension law. you can see current services cut. tax hikes and other lousy outcomes if we don't see reforms. >> you admit we are having problems paying out the pensions. they are bankrupting. >> the problem is that los angeles is not the place. and it is a ballot initiative. you have front runners that become mayor . they will not support it it was a nonstarter and never going to work in the stave . you have a better chance of succeeding. >> at least it was a plan . it is no law that said you cannot change 401 k's. that is future and new hires and for their plans. you don't have ill defined benefits and by the way the private sector doesn't get. there is a pension liability in the state of the california. vicki is right. government services are starting to get cut in cities in california . so i tell you, it doesn't cut it when you have things like let's raise the retirement age to age 52. >> the fact is, these things are going broke. right now the budget 26 percent of la's budget is consumed by the budget cuts and what
food places that the law went into effect. oh, yes. great that we can see the calorie count and they're paying more attention. indelicate the receipts and saw that they were eating more calories. >> well, let me just say that the best thing that we can do is step get the consumer the choice, the option. john: wrote a book titled everything i want to do is illegal. [laughter] >> right. [applause] de. john: what is your point? >> my point is that every time the government penetrates into the food system the abuses mount up from the big guys and little guys like us get routed back from the table do to a smothering bunch of regulations. government interventions come at the result of wind things it out of control. i health care costs to go $150 billion. john: it's his body. he can make his own stupid choices. >> i never believe that i'm hurting anybody's freedom. john: you are banning things. you support the ban on the soft drinks. >> well, the big soft drink is important to realize that we need said -- you have children at the age of nine. they suffer from hypertension as a result of too
. this hits at the core capability of international maritime law, freedom of transit, freedom of navigation rights. lou: we have not heard from the state department or the white house on that challenge. i do want to turn to one statement by -- you mentioned defense secretary leon panetta. he sai the united states should have what he called an enduring presence in afghanistan to pursue the counter-terrorism effort, the long war that has become the fhion of the last to the ministrations. your thoughts as we wrap up. >> let me tell you about this enlightened. of warfare, counter insurgency. what is, in fact, we are trading our american military life's with the restrictive rules of engagements in the hope of winning the hearts and minds of the tribal society. this is crazy. your first responsibility is to the protection and safety of your own men and women. lou: admiral, terrific of you to be here, and we appreciate. and i know that many of our forces, is not nely all appreciate what you just said about lon morris. admiral james lyons, thank you. up next, one republican congressman gets a littl
this opportunity of hopefully, we join together to see that marriage equality becomes the law of this land. [cheering and applauding] >> we have that opportunity to do so. and i think everybody who holds office or holds an appointed position in the city is proud to see this diversity. this is what we have worked so hard, so many struggles. and we still remind ourselves of the night of the assassination and what had occurred and how this city was so divided. i believe now that there is such a great unity. when we talk about diversity in the city, how that unity transforms itself. it really is part of our dna in everything that we do. and, so, it is in this spirit that i welcome all of you to this 34th tribute and this remembrance. it is in the spirit that we set a foundation continually to go forward and be even more diverse and continue to invite people who have never been a part of this government, take up it this responsibility with us. help us bring more people into the economy, to the wonderful city of san francisco. * make sure that their lives are respected with dignity and with the
into the fast food places after your law went into effect and people said, oh, yeah, it's great we can see the calorie count and we are paying more attention and then the look at the receipts and saw they were eating more calories. didn't do any good. >> well, let me just say this. the best thing that we can do is to give the consumer the choice. the option. >> you wrote a book titled, everything i want to do is illegal. >> right. [applause] >> what's your point? >> my point is that everytime the government penetrates into the food system, the abuses mount occupy from the big guys and little guys like us get rooted back from the table due to a smothering bunch of regulations. >> the little guys, it puts them oust business, the big guys can afford these rules. >> absolutely. the regulations are nonscalable. all sound wonderful when you first say them, and then as soon as the get implement on the ground, the innovative prototypes who want to bring innovation the marketplace have such a large overhead to get a place at the market place that these embryonic prototypes of innovation are stillbo
in the courthouse when d.n.a. started coming into be used at the courthouse. prior to that many law enforcement and prosecutors had to rely on blood samples and fingerprints, but once d.n.a. came in and we learned everybody has a unique genetic makeup and it can be connected and traced to perpetrators of crime when they commit a crime, especially in sexual assault cases. and convictions have gone up. the evidence is better. the proof beyond a reasonable doubt is much more available in d.n.a. cases. in 1985, there was a 13-year-old girl named lavenia masters. she lived in dallas, texas. she told her folks good night. she went to her bedroom which should be, mr. speaker, the safest place on earth for children -- went to sleep and during the middle of the night she was woken up by an outlaw putting a knife to her throat and he sexually assaulted her. then he snuck away in the darkness of the night. that was in 1985. she went to the hospital. her parents took care of her medical needs. d.n.a. evidence was taken from her. it was given to the law enforcement authorities, but that d.n.a. evidence from
fimay. the law signed will give students flexibility to pay back under the condition they pay back the loans and that is important reform as well tracey is right. the principle issue is whether kids coming out of the college have an opportunity to get a job. that's what we need to fix. >> john than, i want to go to wayne rogers. john thob's education in the bahamas aside. education is important for all of the kids, but the debt is bad for all of us. that is a bigger problem here. >> there has to be a happy medium. i agree with julian. you have to educate the public and we have to have a better way to run it. the federal government can run it any better than anybody else. there is so many ways for a kid to go to college to apply for all kinds of scholarships and either thingings andine if student lones and i worked in college. i had a loan and i worked to help pay off that loan while in college. there are ways to correct the system to make it work. john you know kids don't have the same advantages . they need the help and from government to get through at a shot of a good life. and
, mich. on the line for democrats. caller: i think they need to pass a law that these guys did not get paid. if i go to work and did not do my job, they will not pay me. they have not done their jobs in the years. they need to listen to the american people. we picked barack obama up for a reason because we like his policies. they need to get a clue. they are already struggling and having a hard time. if they do not get a clue, they will not be back there. host: republicans say the president and democrats are not making any good-faith offers, the same thing democrats say about republicans. how do we get them to move past with the speaker is calling a stalemate? caller: the people need to look at their actions, not what people are saying. these obstructionists' have locked down congress for years now. they are just continuing to do it. they refuse to admit to obama has a mandate to tax these rich people. just the other day the corporate income is up to 1175 trillion dollars. these corporations are sitting on this money. they sat on it all through the election to make obama look bad. i kn
were in law school together, we were fellow janitors at hastings college of law. george moscone was amazing. he was just as aggressive about inclusionary activities. he was just as focused on sharing. and he had an immense pride in the city and county of san francisco like no other. i suspect that much of my love of the city comes from my exposure to george in those very early years. george went through a considerable amount of evolutionary process politically. he allowed john burton to talk him into running for the state legislature. an unsuccessful effort for the state assembly. he went on to become, obviously, a supervisor in the city and county of san francisco. and in those days it was a different city. it was dramatically different. there was no such thing as a so-called progressive, david campos. there was no such thing as somebody in that category. george moscone, philip burton, represented that which we all now richly enjoy. george went on to become a state senator. and in that capacity, scott, it was george moscone who shepherded the bill that removed criminal penaltie
to take these young women when they are interacting with law enforcement because a lot of them find themselves into prostitution and get treated like perpetrators as opposed to victims. this is the psychology of a perpetrator but they are victims and we have to get law enforcement and our judicial system to treat these women as victims and put them in a setting to pull themselves away from drug addition. >> in a minute, politico is -- politico is going to ask you some questions. one of the questions that has come in, who is the best leader in washington, d.c.? >> robert griffin, iii. >> why did the majority of americans reject the republican party in the recent election? >> it was an election and it was a very close election. if you look at the nims and the differences between the two. i think the republican party can do a better job of limited government and freep enterprise movement and connect those policies. >> why has there been a failure to connect? >> i'm not sure there is one reason for it and i haven't had time to think about it why it has happened but it needs to happen. t
-run health insurance exchange to implement, as you know, a key part of the president's federal law. how is that likely to go over with the nearly i think it's 20% of residents in her state that have no health insurance? >> well, it shouldn't go over well, and we'll see whether that 20% rises up and says, look, this is the law. you have to follow the law. also i wonder if there's anything, anything that the federal government can do to get miss brewer -- governor brewer to do right by the citizens of her state. >> governor brewer hosted the western governors association winter meeting this weekend, yet when she delivered her keynote speech on the subject of energy, only two of her fellow governors showed up. maybe they'd heard her answer a report aers question about climate change. >> everybody has an opinion on it, you know, and, you know, i probably don't believe that it's manmade. i believe that, you know, that weather and certain elements are controlled maybe by different things. >> controlled by different things. do you think she spent too much time in the sunshine? >> different thi
's tied up in sequestration, and the way the -- as i understand it anyway -- the way the law requires the cuts to be taken, it really is, it really is an axe right at the middle which will be very difficult to do in any kind of smooth way. so i'm confident that, you know, with a little longer-term view the pentagon can be fine. and one of the things that the group agrees on is that both with that time and where we are in terms of our overall requirements in a changing world, the advancement of technology, the quality of the people we have -- and they're the best i've seen in over 43 years of having the privilege to wear the uniform -- that we will be fine from a defense standpoint. but i also would pick up on what senator nunn said, quoting bill perry. and i've seen this in countries and in regions globally where the failure to be able to invest in preventive defense, engagement, having a relationship, helping other militaries train in their own countries, the not being able to do that just increases the likelihood of some kind of conflict breaking out which may or may not involve us.
sponsored it was signed in to law by governor ginned l, it's been ruled unconstitutional. we had a similar kind of challenge in the state of florida. these are setbacks that require constant vigilance and continued work. there will be pushback galore going forward. if we stay true to these five principles, five ideas and we're faithful in the implementation we can reverse the trend and shake the complacent sei that exists in the country. one of the great challenge for our country is to raise accountability, raise standards to set higher expectations of what the next generation needs to know. benchmark it to the world. make it competitive with the world's best. michael talked about how great britain has done that successfully. the united states needs to transform its system of expectations in the same way. common core state standards is the right step in that direction. 46, i think, states have embraced the idea of fewer, higher expectations that require critical thinking skills that are benchmarked to the best in the world. common core will also bring out, unfortunately, for those that are
conservatives quit the deportation law and order harshness. then i think having put that aside, having shown there's some compassion i think you can go back to that group, george w. bush got 40%, jeb bush got close to 50%, governor perry gets a high amount. it can to be done, star. >> i'm not saying it can't to be done but you can't say that even under george bush the policy was very different within the republican party when it looked at immigration in shutting the borders. has it intensified? yes. i'm from california. i understand what you're talking about. this is v-very difficult rhetoric that's been put against this particular people. but that's not the only question when we're talking about the latino community. >> star parker, thank you. i want to talk to you some more. we'll go back to the fiscal cliff. if high end tax rates are successful entrepreneurs rocket higher, you can bet the number of millionaires in this country is going south. that's if high taxes go up. millionaires go down. that's no good. in our land of opportunity, i want more millionaires. and i think the better for t
:30 a.m. >> washbourne went to harvard law school. he emigrated out west to illinois where the lead mine industry was in its heyday. he arrived after a month's journey by ship, by stagecoach, by train, and arrived in this muddy mining town, boarded himself in a log cabin, established a look -- law practice. he worked his way up and became a successful lawyer. he got involved politically, ran for congress. served for eight terms. he befriended abraham lincoln and you sillies s. gragrant. washbourne was a close confidante. after grant was elected president, he appointed washbou rne secretary of state. washbourne became ill. his family felt for his life -- there for his life. he submitted his resignation. grant accepted his resignation. over the next couple of months, he regained his health, which was always fragile. grant offered him the position as minister of france and ambassador. >> michael hill, elihu washbourne. the only diplomat from a major power to stay during the siege of paris. son and 9:00. >> first lady mr. obama welcome to military families to the white house for this season'
, dividends. current laws, they go back up. dividends treated as ordinary income. capital gains goes back up to 20%. how much revenue are we talking about? if those become bargaining chips, how much are we giving up? >> under current law, the capital gains rate is scheduled to go to 20%. we are actually talking 23.8%. dividends are scheduled to go to ordinary rates. you need the 3.8% for people who have higher incomes. significant increases in both are scheduled. as you think about the fiscal cliff and what is coming, one of the few places you can see people responding to it is in their behavior around capital gains and dividends. companies are moving up to how, shareholders take a vintage of a lower rate. i expect you will see more investors realize lower capital gains in order to get lower rates. there is clearly money there. there is clearly money that has interesting, distributional characteristics. as you think about the political process trying to structure when a package with a revenue goal and a distribution goal, my prediction is you will see at least some of those increases occur.
the president signed into law in november of 1990 to implement the agreement and the issues that we confronted on the entitlement spending were really not addressed but rather find an agreement that is largely reached out of exhaustion and convenience. bringing the debate to a close in the congress for the midterm elections that was the reason. those issues and no surprise remain even today and the revenues they were not solved then and they've been on the course returned again to dominate our current debate. i must also know that 500 million-dollar deficit reduction that we agreed to back then in two-thirds was on the spending side, and one third was from the increased fee and revenue. those savings and spending nearly $200 billion came from putting caps on discretionary spending primarily defense spending is very small percentage actually can from addressing the entitlements less than 10%. i want to make sure that the senator acknowledges there was no defeat to get the enforceable caps. they were considered to be just another procedure but david turnout for a while as an obstacle to the over
-raisers. >>> federal judge temporarily blocks federal law, banning the use of conversion therapy. his ruling applies to only three providers who want the law overturned. the therapy is aimed at helping change a minor sexual orientation from gay to straight. >>> 13 people dead, 32 wounded. now the judge in the case has been removed. u.s. court of appeals for the armed services says the judge showed bias when he ordered h hasan be forcibly shaved before his court-martial. hasasm n argued that he grew a beard in accordance with his muslim faith and the order violated his religious freedom. with the san antonio express news, joining us this morning. welcome. >> thank you. >> i thought it was against army regulations to have facial hair. >> it generally is. the regulation is so strict, in fact, that most of the people i've known in the military don't even wear mustaches. and when they did, they were in the war zone. for example, invasion of iraq, one of my buddies wore a pretty thick mustache. that was out of regulation but no one cares when you're in the war zone. at fd hood, that's a different matter.
to try to see if there is a way we can break through the law jim and go ahead and get things done. i am here to tell you that nobody wants to get this done more than me. i know that you have had a lot of briefings. let me describe where the situation is right now with respect to our fiscal situation, both for the opportunities are and where the challenges are. i campaigned over the last year on the idea that we need to make sure that this economy is growing, that we are providing ladders of opportunity. connell: president obama there in washington. we have lost the shop. if we get it back, we can rejoin the president. one of the things he talked about, passionately rooting for the success of the business leaders. dagen: i think that is fair. about an hour after speaker boehner spoke this morning about the fiscal cliff ago she haitians. in case you missed it, a quick piece of that. >> if you look at the plant that the white house has talked about thus far, they could not pass either house. dagen: rich benson is here. he is joining us with the latest from d.c. >> i think you can tell wher
code book on disabilities. not going tos it's change the laws, and he is lying. host: you're talking about yesterday's debate in the senate. caller: exactly. i wish he would be as passionate about try to get people on the west coast back to work. if they would work as hard on that as the disabilities act, this country would not have the fiscal cliff because people would be working. everybody is always trying to blame the tea party. but tea party did not put this country in debt. but the party is trying to bring it to the attention of the people that these entitlements cannot be afforded any more. it is like your charge card. if you keep charging and taking and taking, pretty soon you have to pay it back. that is what is going on with this fiscal cliff. it's time to pay. it's not the republican party's fault. obama has been in office four years. he has doubled to the trillions of dollars in debt. host: are you a tea party supporter? caller: i'm not affiliated with the tea party, but i am tired of hearing them blame it, because i see the hard-working generation that are in their 60s th
the wall and his face lift up. >> she also worked in law enforcement and she would understand what the benefit is to all of our community to have these police officers. we'll talk to that new york police officer larry deprimo. this is coming up at 8:50 today on the show. >> brian: he's always done good things like that. straight ahead. one of the most popular drugs on the market. it could contain glass. >> steve: that's never good. remember the keen from thelma and louise. our next guest is saying democrats want to take us over the cliff. he's naming names on "fox and friends". yahoo. hey! did you know that honey nut cheerios has oats that can help lower cholesterol? and it tastes good? sure does! wow. it's the honey it makes it taste so... well, would you look at the time... what's the rush? be happy. be healthy. it's my favorite time of year again and now -- i got a great new way to get deals. it's called bankamerideals, from bank of america. i choose the cash back deals in my mobile or online banking. i just use my bank of america debit or credit card when i pay.
on american law. this treaty isn't about american behavior except to the degree that it influences other countries to be more like us. this treaty is about the behavior of other countries and their willingness to raise their treatment of people with disabilities to our level. it's that simple. this treaty isn't about changing america. it's a treaty to change the world to be more like america. so why join? i've heard my colleagues ask several times. why, if it doesn't have recourse in the law, why join? i'll tell you why, mr. preside mr. president. because we can sit at the table and affect the lives of our citizens by pushing other countries upwards. because we gain credibility and accelerate change through our advocacy by being part of a process. because it's good for american business, which can sell products and services as other nations raise their standards and need our expertise to meet their goals, which is why, incidentally, the united states chamber of commerce supports this treaty and a huge number of businesses. why support it? because george h.w. bush started this process and
benefits you get after the health care law. open enrollment ends december 7th. so now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. so now's the time. music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my phone. connection to doctors who get where i'm from. and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never missed a beat. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. >>> we should not be sitting around twiddling our thumbs. the clock is running. we face a fiscal cliff. there are some in this chamber who have said, oh, we need to go off of it. we'll go off of it. we'll pay the price and then we'll finally sit down and do what's right. i would, with all due respect, say that's pretty stupid. >> that was some blunt talk from my next guest, republican senator from georgia, johnny isaacson. that was two and a half weeks ago. the more things change, the more th
better decisions, better policies. this term algorithmic regulation, which means you can have laws and policies in the cities determined by data and not just what we think is best, but what's actually best. so, as cities keep catching on and more and more with the data, you're going to see some really interesting things coming out. >> cool. while we're talking about data, another part of the announcement today was also motion loft making private data available within sort of that initiative and that website wrieri'd like to hear a little more, john, about kind of deciding to share that data with the city and also a lot of times especially with other companies you see them being very protective of their data. there is a lot of value there. how do you sort of balance, protecting the value of your data and commercial viability versus making it available to the public? >> so, we have a unique problem, i think, to a lot of start-ups in the fact that we have a product that we sell and a lot of different vertical. we also have data we want to provide to the society at large. and how do we
in central europe, leading the region in laws and in the constitution of equality 16 years ago to a complete reversal today. it's got one of the worst records today of the deprivation of rights of women, roma people, jews, and lgbt people. sound familiar, that grouping? i was not prepared for what i was going to find in budapest. i was not prepared for the thousands ofneo nazis and state sanctioned militia that would meet a couple hundred marchers, thousands of them. * there was one young man, 21 years old, young hungarian, who would be the only person to go on tv with me, only hungarian, malan would take a blow horn and walk through the streets against families that hated us, and he walked and he shouted and he kept the morale up as we were walking against this sea of people who didn't like us because we were representing the inclusion and diversity that we so much cherish here. he was inspired by the story of my uncle and he said to me, do you think this is how harvey felt? and i said to him, it's exactly how harvey felt. now, after the march i learned that malan had refused to go into the
to out law lesbian and gay teachers in our schools, tom, a gay teacher himself, spoke out and was the facebook, the picture book of that campaign. so, we aloe tom an incredible debt, and we thank you so much. * all owe (applause) [cheering and applauding] >> thank you so much. there is a note from willie brown that says, tom, be short. [laughter] >> i don't know, scott. every time i see you, i want to take off my clothes. i don't know what that is. [laughter] >> you can read into that whatever you wanted to. i think you should see from the remarks that preceded me that one strong attribute of both these extraordinary men was a sense of humor and a sense of irony. i've often thought about the differences in their background and how they came together in that context that juxtaposition in history. you know, san francisco, as the former mayor and speaker mentioned, was very eclectic, electric at the time, women's movement, the lgbt movement, the civil rights movement, and, you know, things were happening, boys and girls. harvey's election i think made people take notice. i
person out of 370 million americans who can sign something into law and that's the president. >> 60% of americans are asking the wealthy to pay more. >> reporter: a "the washington post" poll say 53% of americans will blame republicans and 29% would hold the president responsible if the nation goes over the fiscal cliff. the two sides appear close to an agreement on little things. it could lead to higher airline ticket prices and no more mail delivery on saturday. >> oh, boy. susan mcginnis in washington this morning. susan, thank you so much. one of the tax breaks due to expire next month is the payroll tax. that's the tax listed on your pay stub as fica. the money you pay into social security and medicare. it was reduced by two percentage points during the recession. jim axelrod has more. >> reporter: the payroll tax cut has given this family an extra $70 a month to spend. john is a maintenance man in jersey city, new jersey. >> are you paying any attention to what's going on in washington right now? >> of course. >> reporter: their $50,000 a year income put them almost exactly in
coverage, save money, or both. and check out the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. open enrollment ends december 7th. so now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. with odor free aspercreme. powerful medicine relieves pain fast, with no odor. so all you notice is relief. aspercreme. >>> news today out of australia that the mother of media tycoon rupert murdock has died. dame elizabeth murdock has four children, and her son went on to control the global media company news corp. we are told she died at her home in melbourne. she was 103 years old. michael holmes is with us, an aussie himself. >> indeed. >> she was -- she's a hero in australia. why? tell us a little bit about her. >> people look very fondly on dame elizabeth. she was a remarkable woman in her own right, and, in fact, the tale of how she came to be where she was in a position to help so many people is a good one too. she came from a reasonably well off family. went to a boarding school. when she's 18 she appears in a magazine as a deb taunt, right? >> right. sure. >> the publisher o
the texas law. the federal government is a total ailure at almost everything. i don't know if they are too big. maybe you want tgive them the benefit of the doubt. they just don't know when and solve problems. we shouldn't send them more tax revenue. this is exactly why. they may try to help people, but they are terrible about it. they never actually succeed. when youook at what is going on. neil: when they are out there to see what's going on, i have a couple of friends of the show that residents that were out there instead. >> right. neil: i think that is what is concerning me. getting it backwards i think new jersey, something like $10,000 up to $40,000 -- we have to vent for the money back and wehave to wait for someone in a building in washington dc to decide where the money is going to be distributed when we should just keep it in the house. you know, keep the taxes the same, but let new jersey pulled onto a larger version of it. neil: melissa? >> you know the faces, you know how to help them. when this country relied more on the community, your friends, your church -- the people aro
, and by british financial law, went their rights it is british government's fault for not closing the hoop holes that many of the companies are taking full advantage of. good to have you. >> thank you. neil: what do you make of this? >> put it this contact, for the moment, britain. david cameron came into power. neil: they are sweating a lot. >> they instigated deficit reduction it has been tough times, britain with a double dip recession this year, so, it is all about shared sacrifice, everyone from the queen, doing their bit. neil: does the queen sacrifice? >> she seen as not taking -- but all about everybody on the budget. then you have starbucks that found out, you can't move the starbucks in britain, taking away a lot of traditional british tea shops have you starbucks. it has moved in over a third of coffee shops are starbucks. past 14 years starbucks paid lesser than 1% in corporate tax rates. neil: in britain. is it legal? >> it is legal, but the loopholes have to close, to be fair to starbucks, they realized this is p, suicide, they said we do need to pay more, it will be interesting wh
that i still don't have it. if it's in mr. crump's hands, he should turn it over to law enforcement. if not, he should be subpoenaed to turn it over. that is crucial evidence. i deserve it and my client deserves it. >> let me come back one last point about that new hd version of the photo we've seen. mr. crump, martin family attorney, says he's still waiting for the x-ray of george zimmerman's nose to determine whether it was actually broken. what can you tell us about that and when will it be ready? >> well, mr. crump knows because he saw the medical records before i did, since they were forwarded to him from the state attorney's office, there are no x-rays because mrs. zimmerman when he went to the doctor the next day, he really went to be cleared for work. they suggested he get some x-rays and he didn't do it. obviously in retrospect, now that this is an issue, i wish we had x-rays. however, now that we have that picture, i'll let the judge decide, i'll let a jury decide as to whether or not that, in george's mind, was great bodily injury and of course we have the hits to the bac
lynch purchase and the country wide buy. one gigantic law firm with a bank attached. that's how much their earnings have been dependent upon legal obligations. and that's what cuts them. bank of america led the dow today, broke out above $10. a level hasn't been seen in ages as the unsold homes dwindles, i think it probably goes higher. here's the bottom line, listen to me, go ahead, be gloomy, you have every right. be critical, and be angry at those who can't rise above the rhetoric in washington to avoid a recession. and don't even have the common decency to give us legislation before taking a vacation. you know what these people remind me of? they remind me of the star trek villain who showed the wrath on us by sticking proverbial ear wigs into our ears. but the ceos of the companies themselves, sorry, in true scotty fashion, they're giving her all they've got, and just like spock, they want you to live long and prosper. bob in florida, bob? >> caller: hey, big boo-yah to you, cramer. >> right back at ya. >> caller: first thing i want to do is thank you quick for all you do to dem
you get after the health care law. open enrollment ends december 7th. so now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. we believe the more you know, the better you trade. so we have ongoing webinars and interactive learning, plus, in-branch seminars at over 500 locations, where our dedicated support teams help you know more so your money can do more. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our teams have the information you want when you need it. it's another reason more investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. i'd like to thank eating right, whole grain, multigrain cheerios! mom, are those my jeans? [ female announcer ] people who choose more whole grain tend to weigh less than those who don't. multigrain cheerios >>> sitting down may be harmful to your health. according to research from the uk, sitting for prolonged periods of time increases the risk for heart disease and type 2 diabetes. the results held true even after including participant exercise. >>> new this morning, the house will vote in less than an hour on a gop immi
because it would allow american government to impose new laws on disabled home school children. there is no wording that hints that either one of those things could be true. for some of the senators, the real reasoning was because they believe the treaty is part of a vast conspiracy. >> vast conspiracy to tell us that the world is round. everybody knows that ain't so. we could fall right off. >> stephanie: bob dole came to show his support for the treaty. john mccain even voted for it. there they are. >> blue helmets and black helicopters everywhere you look. >> stephanie: you know what? what a perfect day to have spongebob squarepants on the show with a message for republicans. ♪ spongebob here ♪ ♪ kris means presents and mistletoe ♪ ♪ sharing and caring ♪ ♪ during this season, please, don't be a jerk ♪ ♪ bring joy to the world it's the thing to do ♪ ♪ the world does not revolve around you ♪ ♪ don't be a jerk ♪ ♪ it's christmas ♪ ♪ there's a sign above the line that says exp
the health care law. open enrollment ends december 7th. so now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. is what drives us to broadcast the world's biggest events in 3d, or live to your seat high above the atlantic ocean. it's what drives us to create eco-friendly race tracks, batteries that power tomorrow's cars, nearly indestructible laptops, and the sustainable smart towns of the future. at panasonic, we're driven to make what matters most better. just another way we're engineering a better world for you. ♪ >>> all right. time for sports. a little -- i don't know if it's news. it's potential news coming out of the s.e.c., "the times-picayune" trying to lure les miles from lsu. why would he leave? the money. he won a national championship with them in 2 oop. already the fifth highest coach and makes 3.7 million bucks a year but arkansas's offer would make him the highest paid coach even ahead of nick saban. his agent has denied reports of that offer. the razorbacks have a history of shelling out big upon for their coaches. bobby petrino was making $3.6 million -- >> bou
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